Photo
Whoa.

Whoa.

(Source: theblackworkshop, via thecultureofme)

Photo
onethingbeautiful:

3 No. 17 on Flickr.
Photo
design-is-fine:

Wilhelm Kienzle, serving cart, 1935. Aluminum and wood. Made by Mewa, Switzerland. Via Fischer auctions

design-is-fine:

Wilhelm Kienzle, serving cart, 1935. Aluminum and wood. Made by Mewa, Switzerland. Via Fischer auctions

(Source: fischerauktionen.ch)

Link

tetw:

as chosen by Amanda Oliver:

I have been on Tumblr for nearly four years and steadily been finding great accounts related to writing. Thought I’d share some of my favorites for other writers or aspiring writers. 

GENERAL

The Electric Typewriter I am convinced that Dan, the curator of tetw, has found and neatly catalogued every good bit of writing on the internet. I could be wrong, but check for yourself.

Last Nights Reading Drawings by Kate Gavino with quotes from readings in New York City.

The Rumblr The Tumblr account for The Rumpus. Their posts, reblogs, gifs, and horoscopes by Madame Clairevoyant make me giddy ever time they come up on my dashboard.

Press 53 A publisher of short fiction and poetry collections based in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Their Poetry Wednesdays, Flash Fiction Fridays, and 53-story contests inspire many a sentence and story.

Penguin Classics From the editors of Penguin Books and Penguin Classics, they share quotes, photos, and, my personal favorite, Friday Final Lines. Every Friday, they offer the closing lines of a Penguin Classic.

The Paris Review Curated by their digital director Justin Alvarez, the quarterly literary magazine’s Tumblr is full of inspirational graphics and quotes that link to Paris Review articles, essays, and interviews well worth reading.

Button Poetry Even though they have only been around a little over a year, they consistently showcase new (and incredible) performance poets.

Yeah Write Everything creative writing related. Quotes, book lists, interesting articles and graphics

Electric Literatures Recommended Reading Recommended Reading is released on a four week curation cycle: beginning with a story chosen by Electric Literature, followed by an excerpt from an indie press, then an author recommendation, and finally a selection from a magazine’s archive. Each issue includes an editor’s note written by that week’s partner, introducing you to the work and their mission.

Black Balloon Publishing An independent press based out of New York City. They publish fiction, nonfiction, and memoir and “champion the weird, the unwieldy, and the unclassifiable.” They consistently publish great posts like Can You Identify the Handwriting of These 12 Famous Authors and Daddy Dearest: 10 Literary Fathers and Father Figures to be Glad Aren’t Your Own

Fwriction The online literary journal’s blog, “specializing in work that melts faces and rocks waffles.”

INSPIRATION

Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows Although the account hasn’t been updated in nearly 5 months, there are several years of archives with words and definitions John Koenig created for emotions that otherwise leave us speechless. 

Today’s Document A little history always gets the words flowing for me. The Tumblr for the U.S. National Archives posts one document daily. 

Hello You Creatives A collective of humans being creative. Inspiration, inspiration, inspiration.

Creative Mornings/Findings In a slump? Come here for photos, quotes, projects, and more from other creatives.

BOOK STORES

Strand Books Based in New York City

Powell’s Books Based in Portland, Oregon

Open Books Store Based in Chicago, Illinois

FREELANCE & PUBLISHING

Calls for Submissions for Writers and Poets 

Writing Opportunities

Freelancer Real Talk

RECOMMENDED READING:

Writers No One Reads

NPR Books

**I will continually be adding to the list

Photoset
Link

tetw:

The very best articles and essays about our relationship with words and the writng process, including stone-cold classics by Joan Didion, Zadie Smith, Michael Chabon, John Jeremiah Sullivan, David Foster Wallace, Tom Wolfe and many more…

Photoset

wired:

When 17-year-old George Hotz became the world’s first hacker to crack AT&T’s lock on the iPhone in 2007, the companies officially ignored him while scrambling to fix the bugs his work exposed. When he later reverse engineered the Playstation 3, Sony sued him and settled only after he agreed to never hack another Sony product.

When Hotz dismantled the defenses of Google’s Chrome operating system earlier this year, by contrast, the company paid him a $150,000 reward for helping fix the flaws he’d uncovered. Two months later Chris Evans, a Google security engineer, followed up by email with an offer: How would Hotz like to join an elite team of full-time hackers paid to hunt security vulnerabilities in every popular piece of software that touches the internet?

Today Google plans to publicly reveal that team, known as Project Zero, a group of top Google security researchers with the sole mission of tracking down and neutering the most insidious security flaws in the world’s software. Those secret hackable bugs, known in the security industry as “zero-day” vulnerabilities, are exploited by criminals, state-sponsored hackers and intelligence agencies in their spying operations. By tasking its researchers to drag them into the light, Google hopes to get those spy-friendly flaws fixed. And Project Zero’s hackers won’t be exposing bugs only in Google’s products. They’ll be given free rein to attack any software whose zero-days can be dug up and demonstrated with the aim of pressuring other companies to better protect Google’s users.

MORE: Meet ‘Project Zero,’ Google’s Secret Team of Bug-Hunting Hackers

(Source: Wired)

Link

(Source: condenasttraveler)

Photo
design-is-fine:

El Lissitzky, Electro-Library! 1923. Source

design-is-fine:

El Lissitzky, Electro-Library! 1923. Source

(via twentysixtypes)

Photo
graphicporn:

"If you can design one thing, you can design everything"
Massimo Vignelli, 1931 - 2014
image via Pentagram

graphicporn:

"If you can design one thing, you can design everything"

Massimo Vignelli, 1931 - 2014

image via Pentagram